Vitamins & Minerals For Optimum Health

Note: Vitamins, minerals and all foods mentioned should be organic whenever possible. The purpose of this section is to help you to understand how important a seemingly insignificant thing like a vitamin or mineral is. Our cells need constant nutrients, and the only way for that to happen is through a healthy diet and quality supplements. Fill out the “contact us” form at the end of this section for information about a company and products that are scientifically developed, patented, and the best for your health.

Vitamin A: Sometimes called the “anti-infective vitamin”. What it does:

• Helps to reduce infection;

• Vitamin A is necessary to maintain healthy levels of circulating “T” cells. Even a modest deficiency can weaken the immune defenses of the respiratory tract against viruses and bacteria.

• Vitamin A also enhances the activity of white blood cells against viruses and bacteria.

Top food sources:

• Dark-green leafy vegetables;

• Bell peppers;

• Butternut squash;

• Cabbage;

• Cantaloupe;

• Carrots;

• Sweet potatoes.

All of these contain large amounts of beta-carotene, which is the water soluble form of vitamin A that will not build up in the fatty tissues. Generally, the brighter the color of a vegetable, the more vitamin A it contains.

Vitamin C:

What it does:

• It is a potent antioxidant that protects immune cells from free radical damage;

• It is vital to the production of white blood cells;

• It may reduce the duration and severity of cold symptoms by inhibiting the release of histamine, an inflammatory chemical that causes a runny nose and respiratory congestion.

• Important for overall immune function;

• Strengthens blood vessels and capillary walls;

• Critical in the creation of collagen, the building block of all cells;

• Helps keep gums healthy;

• Helps the body absorb iron from foods.

Top food sources:

• Oranges and grapefruit;

• Bell peppers;

• Broccoli;

• Cantaloupe;

• Kiwifruit;

• Rutabagas;

• Strawberries;

• Sweet potatoes;

• Tomatoes.

Vitamin E:

What it does:

• This potent antioxidant sacrifices its own electrons to cell-damaging free radicals, effectively neutralizing them;

• Vitamin E also raises levels of interferon and interleukin, chemicals produced by the immune system to fight infection;

• Helps to maintain a healthy heart and circulatory system.

Top food sources:

• Wheat germ;

• Molasses;

• Whole grains;

• Nuts, and seeds.

Zinc:

What it does:

• A mineral known for its ability to lessen the severity and duration of colds;

• Plays a critical role in maintaining a strong immune system;

• Helps stabilize and protect your primary barriers against infectious organisms;

• Helps protect your skin and mucous membranes;

• Promotes the normal development of immune cells;

• Zinc also has antioxidant properties;

• Helps protect the prostate gland;

• Helps with tissue growth;

• Important for taste perception.

Top food sources:

• Fish;

• Shellfish;

• Skinless poultry;

• Lean cuts of pork;

• Whole grains;

• Yogurt.

Vitamin D:

What it does:

• Increases absorption of calcium and phosphorus, which leads to stronger bones and teeth;

• Essential for maintaining strong bones and preventing osteoporosis;

• Helps the thymus gland generate a sufficient number of immune cells;

• May guard against high blood pressure;

• Helps with depression;

• Helps with type 2 diabetes;

• Helps with some types of cancer.

Top food sources:

• Eggs;

• Butter;

• Fortified milk;

• Salmon;

• 15 minutes of sun a day.

Vitamin B6:

What it does:

• Supports the activity of white blood cells;

• Enhances immune and nervous system function;

• Helps the body make red blood cells;

• Converts tryptophan to niacin;

• Used in the metabolism of proteins and fats.

Top food sources:

• Fish;

• Poultry;

• Lean meats;

• Whole grains;

• Leafy greens;

• Bananas;

• Prunes;

• Peanuts;

• Walnuts;

• Chickpeas.

Vitamin B12:

What it does:

• Important for proper nerve function;

• Works with folate, converting it to an active form;

• Helps make red blood cells;

• Helps metabolize proteins and fats.

Top food sources:

• Eggs (organic, free range are the best);

• Fish;

• Shellfish;

• Lean meat;

• Milk;

• Yogurt;

• Liver.

Biotin:

What it does:

• Contributes to energy production;

• Helps with metabolism of proteins, fats & carbohydrates.

Top food sources;

• Contained in most foods and a healthy diet.

Folate (folic acid):

What it does;

• Critical for all cell functions;

• Helps make DNA and RNA;

• Helps promote and support heart health;

• Helps prevent birth defects.

Top food sources:

• Dark green vegetables;

• Beans, peas, and lentils;

• Liver;

• Orange juice;

• Wheat germ;

• Yeast;

• Fortified cereals.

Vitamin K:

What it does:

• Helps with blood clotting;

• Essential for several proteins involved in healthy blood function.

Top food sources:

• Spinach;

• Broccoli;

• Brussels Sprouts;

• Cabbage;

• Leafy green vegetables;

• Soybean, Canola & Olive oils.

Niacin (B3):

What it does:

• Contributes to energy production;

• Helps in the metabolism of glucose, fat and alcohol.

Top food sources:

• Peanut butter;

• Lean meat;

• Salmon;

• Chicken breast;

• Tuna;

• Liver;

• Bluefish;

• Halibut.

Pantothenic Acid (B5):

What it does:

• Important for skin health;

• Helps with digestive tract health;

• Helps support a healthy nervous system;

• Involved in more than 100 different steps in the synthesis of lipids, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones, and hemoglobin.

Top food sources:

• Found in a good quality diet.

Riboflavin (B2):

What it does:

• Contributes to energy production in all cells;

Top food sources:

• Sunflower seeds;

• Watermelon;

• Green peas;

• Baked potato;

• Lean pork chop;

• Soy milk;

• Shelled pistachios.

Thiamin (B1):

What it does:

• Important for producing energy from carbohydrates;

• Helps in proper nerve function;

Top food sources:

• Green peas;

• Potato;

• Watermelon;

• Sunflower seeds;

• Lean ham;

• Soy milk;

• Lean pork chops.

Calcium:

What it does:

• Critical for strong bones and teeth;

• Helps with the transmission of nerve impulses;

• Helps support immune system functioning;

• Assists in muscle contractions;

• Helps in the clotting of blood;

• Helps in the secretion of hormones;

• Helps in the activation of some enzyme reactions;

• Activates a protein called calmodulin, which relays messages from the cell surface to the inside of the cell. Several of these messages help to maintain normal blood pressure.

Top food sources:

• Milk (organic is best, low fat or skim);

• Swiss cheese (it is as high in calcium as milk);

• Plain yogurt;

• Cheddar cheese;

• Sardines (with bones);

• Blackstrap molasses;

• Tofu (Soybean curd);

• Spinach;

• Salmon.

Chromium:

What it does:

• Works to support the function of insulin;

• Required for the release of energy from glucose.

Top food sources:

• Liver;

• Brewer’s yeast;

• Whole grains;

• Nuts;

• Cheese.

Copper:

What it does:

• Supports red blood cell health;

• Helps in the absorption of iron;

• Is a key factor in hemoglobin synthesis;

• One of copper’s many enzymes helps in the manufacture of collagen and in healing wounds;

• Is needed in many of the metabolic reactions related to the release of energy.

Top food sources:

• Shellfish;

• Legumes;

• Whole grains;

• Nuts;

• Organ meats;

Seeds.

Iodine:

What it does:

• Supports growth and metabolism;

• Helps the thyroid gland in the regulation of body temperature;

• Helps in the regulation of metabolic rate;

• Helps in the regulation of reproduction;

• Helps in the regulation of blood cell production;

• Helps in the regulation of nerve and muscle function.

Top food sources:

• Oysters (huge amount of iodine);

• Crab;

• Salmon;

• Any seafood;

• Unrefined sea salt;

• Kelp, seaweed.

Iron:

What it does:

• Important in red blood cell formation;

• Helps in oxygen utilization in the body;

• Helps enzymes involved in the making of amino acids, hormones, and neurotransmitters;

Top food sources:

• Canned clams;

• Beef liver;

• Parsley;

• Tofu;

• Shrimp;

• Most beans;

• Lean sirloin steak;

• Nuts.

Magnesium:

What it does:

• Helps build bones and teeth;

• Helps with proper nerve function;

• Helps with proper muscle function;

• Supports a healthy immune system;

• Works with many body enzymes;

• Necessary for energy metabolism;

• Essential to the body’s use of glucose;

• Essential to the synthesis of protein, fat and nucleic acid;

• Helps in the cell’s membrane transport systems;

• Working with calcium, it helps in muscle contraction and blood clotting;

• Helps to hold calcium in the teeth;

Top food sources:

• Tofu (#1);

• Halibut;

• Cashews;

• Artichokes;

• Sunflower seeds;

• Millet;

• Black eyed peas;

• Most beans;

• Potato;

• Spinach.

Manganese (trace mineral):

What it does:

• Necessary in iron metabolism;

• Part of many body enzymes;

Top food sources:

• A combination of healthy foods and a healthy diet.

Molybdenum (trace mineral):

What it does;

• Works with calcium to form bones and teeth;

• Involved in energy production in the body;

• Part of cell membranes;

Top food sources:

• Legumes;

• Bread;

• Whole grains;

• Green vegetables (organic is the best choice);

• Milk;

• Liver.

Phosphorus:

What it does:

• Part of DNA and RNA, necessary for all growth;

• Assists in energy metabolism;

• Major structural components of cell membranes;

• Help with the transport of nutrients into and out of the cells;

Top food sources:

• Liver;

• Sunflower seeds;

• Most beans;

• Chicken breast;

• Almonds;

• Yogurt, plain;

• Milk;

• Cod;

• Tuna.

Potassium:

What it does:

• Important for nerve transmission;

• Helps in muscle contraction;

• Plays a major role in balancing fluids and electrolytes in the body;

• Helps maintain cell integrity;

• Helps maintain a steady heartbeat.

Top food sources:

• Potato;

• All fresh greens;

• Watermelon;

• Squash;

• Soybeans;

• Artichoke;

• Tomato juice;

• Most wholesome foods contain potassium.

Selenium:

What it does:

• Powerful antioxidant;

• Protects cells from damage;

• Important for normal cell function;

• Helps reduce the risk of certain types of cancer;

Top food sources:

• Seafood;

• Lean meat;

• Whole grains.

In Conclusion

In conclusion, I want to stress again how critical proper nutrition is. We must reverse the bad health trend, and stop supporting the “sickness industry” (Western medicine), and looking to this broken system for answers to live a longer and healthier life. The answer is in the food you eat, the supplements you take, and the exercise you do. Please travel around our site for more information. It is under construction, and new information is being added every few days.

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